A family living well with type 1 diabetes.

Posts tagged ‘type 2 diabetes’

What’s Funny?

Let’s dispel a few myths, shall we?:

  • Your eyes won’t stay that way if you cross them. You may turn a few stomachs doing that, but your eyes will return to their normal position again, rest assured.
  • You won’t get a sty in your eye if you pee on the road, but you may just get arrested so don’t, okay? (I can’t be the only person who’s mom shared that little gem, can I?)
  • And finally, you can’t — CAN NOT! — get diabetes from eating too much sugar. Seriously.

You see, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body’s own immune system has made a mistake and turned on the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, killing them and leaving their owner without a means to process the glucose ingested from food.  So people can stop with the inaccurate “jokes” regarding the eating of large quantities of sugar and the onset of diabetes.

Now, I know what some of you might be thinking: What’s the big deal?! It’s a joke! Can’t some people take a JOKE?! Why are you touchy people ruining it for the rest of us?!

Well, first of all, if your life’s happiness hinges upon feeling free to use false and misleading information to make fun of people with chronic illness , you have far worse things to concern you. Like the fact that your sense of humour SUCKS, just for starters.

See, the thing is, I love a good, leg-slapper just as much as the next person. In fact, there is a good case to be made for those of us facing serious life challenges and our increased ability to find the humour in them. But the joke has to be funny. And here’s why these sorts of jokes aren’t funny. First, a joke has to ring true. People have to be able to relate to it. If the joke were about a person with diabetes having to nip off to the loo frequently, well, that could easily happen. A rip-roarin’ bout of hyperglycemia can leave a person with a raging case of polyuria. Or if the joke were about a person with diabetes unknowingly walking around with used test strips stuck to her person, again — could happen. In fact, I’m living proof that it does happen. And it’s funny when it happens! Hell, you should see some of the places I have found used test strips! Uh … on second thought …

But a lame joke that perpetuates a misconception that leads the public to believe that people with diabetes are responsible for getting this disease, I have to draw the line there. There’s nothing funny about people asking you if you gave your child candy as a baby causing her to get diabetes. There’s nothing funny about people judging you or your child to be deserving of a horrible, all consuming, potentially life-shortening disease like diabetes.

Right now I am the one absorbing the emotionally taxing blows of insensitive, uninformed comments because Jenna is so young. But one day she will be the one facing the full impact of jokes and comments made by an ignorant, overly judgemental society. It will become her battle as well to set straight the uninformed among us. And it’s important that she does. If society mistakenly believes that people with diabetes are reaping what they have sown, then the public’s financial support to fund research for better treatments and a cure will be affected by this inaccurate depiction. And we can’t afford to lose donations toward a cure. This disease is on the rise. No one asks for diabetes.

Oh. And for those who are screaming “TYPE 2, you over sensitive Mom of a kid with diabetes! We are laughing at people with type 2 diabetes!!” — first of all, shame on you. Secondly, you should know that there are plenty of fit, slim, otherwise healthy people  out there with type 2 diabetes. Sure, it’s more common among people who are overweight, but it isn’t an exclusive club. There is a genetic predisposition at play and other factors which are not fully understood. And so what if being overweight does contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes in some people? The majority of us in the western world are above our ideal body weight!  Being above your ideal body weight increases your chances of developing other diseases too, like cancer. Would we say of an overweight woman battling breast cancer that she had it coming? How the hell do we know what factors caused someone’s disease? What does it say of our society if we believe those among us fighting disease are merely lying in the beds we made? Are we really that heartless and judgemental? What makes us think we are immune from suffering chronic illness and can therefore make disparaging remarks about those that do?

Be informed. Set people straight. Don’t be afraid to be the only one not laughing at the inappropriate,  callous and misleading “joke”. You never know when this disease — whatever type — will hit too close to home and you’ll wish you’d been a little more sensitive and a lot less judgemental.

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